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Glendale Little League

Guidelines for Concussion and Head Injury

What is the new concussion law for youth sports?

Glendale Little League, in accordance with the recently enacted Wisconsin Concussion Law, Wis. Stat. sec. 118.293, is providing Fact Sheets to Parents, Athlete, and Coaches for review. Parents and players must read the Fact Sheets sign the Parent/Athlete Agreement. The Agreement must be returned to your coach at the first practice/parent meeting. Athletes will not be allowed to practice without a signed Parent/Athlete agreement.

The Concussion Law requires all youth athletic organizations to educate coaches, athletes, and parents on the risks of concussions and head injuries, and prohibits participation in a youth activity until the athlete and parent or guardian has returned a signed agreement sheet indicating they have reviewed the concussion and head injury informational materials. The law requires immediate removal of an individual from a youth athletic activity if symptoms indicate a possible concussion has been sustained. A person who has been removed from a youth athletic activity because of a determined or suspected concussion or head injury may not participate again until he or she is evaluated by a health care provider, and receives written clearance from the health care provider to return to the activity.

 

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that interferes with normal functioning of the brain (changes how the cells in the brain normally work). A concussion can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body. Basically, any force that is transmitted to the head causing the brain to literally bounce around or twist within the skull can result in a concussion. Over 90% of concussions do not involve loss of consciousness It is important to note that a concussion can happen to anyone in any sport or athletic activity.

Concussion affects people in four areas of function:

1.    Physical – This describes how a person may feel: headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, etc.

2.    Thinking – Poor memory and concentration, responds to questions more slowly, asks repetitive questions. Concussion can cause an altered state of awareness.

3.    Emotions - A concussion can make a person more irritable and cause mood swings.

4.    Sleep – Concussions frequently cause changes in sleeping patterns, which can increase fatigue.

Responding to a Concussion or Head Injury

If an athlete exhibits any of the signs, symptoms, or behavior consistent with a concussion or head injury –OR– you simply suspect the person has sustained a concussion or head injury the athlete must be removed from all physical activity immediately. Injured athletes can exhibit many or just a few of the signs, symptoms, or behaviors consistent with a concussion or head injury. A health care provider must evaluate the athlete for concussion. An athlete that has been removed from a youth athletic activity because of a determined or suspected concussion or head injury may not participate again until he or she is evaluated by a health care provider and receives written clearance from the health care provider to return to the activity. No athlete should be allowed to return to play from concussion on the same day.

Not every athlete removed from play will be concussed. It may be appropriate to remove an athlete to error on the side of safety. If a concussion is suspected, the athlete must be evaluated by a health care provider. If health care provider rules out a concussion during a side-line assessment, the athlete can be returned to play if written clearance is provided. “When in doubt, hold them out”.

Common Symptoms Reported by Athlete:

Signs, Symptoms, or Behaviors Consistent with Concussion:
(What others can see in an injured athlete)


Headache
Nausea
Balance problems
Dizziness
Double or fuzzy vision
Sensitivity to light or noise
Feeling mentally foggy
Concentration or memory problems
Confusion
Ringing in the ears


Appear dazed or stunned
Change in level of consciousness or awareness
Confused about what to do
Forgets play(s)
Memory loss/amnesia
Unsure of score, game, opponent
Clumsy
Slow to answer questions or follow directions
Changes in behavior or personality
Loss of consciousness
Asks repetitive questions
Can’t recall events before or after hit/ blow

The appearance of signs, symptoms and behavior of a concussion may be immediate, or maybe delayed several hours, days, or even weeks after the event. It is imperative to notify the parent or guardian when an athlete is removed from play because they are thought to have a concussion.

Most concussions are temporary and they resolve without causing residual problems. Concussion symptoms in children and adolescents take longer than symptoms in adults to resolve. It is not uncommon for symptoms in young athletes to last a few weeks. These symptoms of headache, difficulty concentrating, poor memory and sleep disturbances can result in academic troubles among other problems. Concussion symptoms may even last weeks to months (post-concussion syndrome).

When you suspect and/or confirm that a player has a concussion or head injury:

1.    Immediately remove the athlete from play.

2.    Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a trained health care provider.

3.    Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the suspected and/or confirmed concussion. If a trained health care provider is not available on site at the time of the injury, provide parents/guardians with recommendations on health care providers in the area that can evaluate for a concussion.

4.    A person who has been removed from a youth athletic activity because of a determined or suspected concussion or head injury may not participate again until he or she is evaluated by a health care provider and receives written clearance from the health care provider to return to the activity.

A player recovering from a concussion must be carefully observed to be sure they are not feeling worse. Even though the athlete is not playing, never send a concussed athlete to the locker room alone and never allow the injured athlete to drive home.

Some injured athletes will require emergency care. Anytime you are uncomfortable with an athlete on the sideline, it is reasonable to activate the Emergency Medical System (911). The following are reasons to activate the EMS, as any worsening signs or symptoms may represent a medical emergency:

1.    Loss of consciousness, this may indicate more serious head injury

2.    Decreasing level of alertness

3.    Unusually drowsy

4.    Severe or worsening headache

5.    Seizure

6.    Persistent vomiting

7.    Difficulty breathing

Returning from a Concussion or Head Injury

A person who has been removed from a youth athletic activity may not participate in a youth athletic activity (practice or competition) until he or she is evaluated by a health care provider and receives a written clearance to participate in the activity from the health care provider.

It is recommended that persons operating the youth athletic activity maintain records of all athletes removed from play for suspected and/or confirmed concussions and corresponding written clearances provided by health care providers to return to physical activity. It is further recommended that coaches maintain baseline testing data for all athletes (if available*) during all practices and competitions. This information can then be provided to health care providers after injury.

*There is no requirement that youth athletic organization complete baseline testing.


Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2)

The law defines a "Health care provider" as a person to whom all of the following apply:

1.    He or she holds a credential that authorizes the person to provide health care.

2.    He or she is trained and has experience in evaluating and managing pediatric concussions and head injuries.

3.    He or she is practicing within the scope of his or her credential.

If symptoms of a concussion recur, or if concussion signs and/or behaviors are observed at any time during the return to activity program, the athlete must discontinue all activity and be re-evaluated by a health care provider.

These clearance forms may be used by youth athletic activity organizations. Letters from treating health care providers should also be accepted.

Concussion/Head Injury Frequently Asked Questions & Answers

DPI/WIAA Suggested Concussion Management Example

Concussions and School Performance

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